#WeAreEliott: Rebecca Wolfson

Blog_ #WAE WolfsonRebecca Wolfson is a graduating student from the Masters in International Policy and Practice (“MIPP”) program concentrating in international development and security. She received her bachelor’s degree from George Washington University. Additionally, she recently received her J.D. from George Mason Law School. Particularly, she is interested in rule of law, conflict resolution, and international development. Since her family is originally from Romania, Rebecca is particularly interested in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. She was recently a research assistant at the National Security Institute, analyzing various topics pertaining to global security. She also has experience in international development and security during her time working at various NGOs. Rebecca enjoys musical theater, traveling, and meeting people from all over the world.

What has been your favorite experience at the Elliott School so far and why?

My favorite experience has been getting to know so many people from different countries, cultures, and backgrounds. Most of my classmates came from all over the world have already accomplished so much. It was fascinating getting to know them and learning more about different parts of the world, which provided me knowledge and insight about things that would have been impossible to learn from a textbook. I am looking forward to maintaining these lasting connections and friendships.

What courses have you found most helpful in your work/intern/volunteer experiences and how have they been useful? (Haven’t worked? Answer this: Describe your dream job and explain how the Elliott School can help you get there)

Prior to attending the Elliott School I received a law degree and have worked in the legal field. My first course at the Elliott School was Rule of Law and Anti-corruption. This course broadened my understanding about different countries legal systems and the importance of the rule of law. After taking this course, I knew that I wanted my career to focus on this subject.

What resources (online or offline) or strategies have proven to be the most valuable in helping you reach academic success at the Elliott School?

I have found that the best resources are my professors. Many of them have extensive knowledge about the subject area and have worked for years in their respective fields. I have reached out to my professors about both course work and general career questions and they have all provided me valuable information. They seem to genuinely care about their students. I continue to stay in touch with some of my professors and they continue to help me achieve both my academic and career aspirations.

What advice do you have for prospective students who are on the fence about applying to a graduate program at the Elliott school?

I highly advise going to graduate school if you want to pursue a career in international affairs. You not only learn important and useful information, but it teaches you critical analysis skills that are not taught in undergrad. My biggest advice is to figure out what type of field you want to work in before applying to one of the Elliott School’s many programs. For example, if you want to work in international development, it would be useful to consider applying to the Masters of International Development program. Although every program allows a lot of flexibility, choosing the right program will provide you with additional resources and opportunities.

Favorite place to unwind after class?

My favorite place to unwind after class is at the theater, watching a play or musical. Washington, D.C. has so many different types of theater venues, ranging from Broadway style to Shakespeare to contemporary dramas. A lot of these theaters are also affordable to students and offer many perks and deals for students living in the DMV area. Some of my favorite venues are the National Theater, Signature Theater, Constellation Theater, and of course, the Kennedy Center. Going to the theater is a great way to relax after a busy week and I am always learning something new each time I attend a show.

The #WeAreElliott series highlights current Elliott School graduate students and seeks to answer common questions posed by prospective, current, and incoming students. The views expressed by students profiled do not necessarily represent those of organizations they work for, are affiliated with, or the Elliott School of International Affairs. For more information or to submit questions, e-mail esiagrad@gwu.edu.