Fall 2020 App Tips: M.A. Latin American and Hemispheric Studies

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Latin America is a paradox. This vibrant region is home to significant advances in human rights, a substantial expansion of female and indigenous political representation, imaginative urban designs and creative solutions to ecological challenges. It is also marked by high levels of poverty and inequality, corruption, fragile institutions, and violence, gangs, and drug and organized-crime cartels. “We have not had a moment’s rest,” is how Gabriel García Márquez summed up  – Latin America and the Caribbean, a region that embraces more than 20 sovereign states and several territories and dependencies. The aim of the Masters in Latin American and Hemispheric Studies is to enable students to develop a deep and broad understanding of the region and its trials and contributions. Simultaneously, the program prepares them for careers in government, multinational and nongovernmental organizations, the private sector, or post-graduate academic work. Grounded by the expertise of GW’s faculty and selected practitioners in the field, the program combines rigorous academics with a professional orientation.

Continue reading “Fall 2020 App Tips: M.A. Latin American and Hemispheric Studies”

Fall 2020 App Tips: M.A. International Affairs

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Globalization of economic, political, social and cultural activity has created opportunities and challenges for tomorrow’s leaders in international affairs. Rarely have we lived in such an uncertain world. As a result, the need for increased international understanding and cooperation has become essential. The Elliott School’s M.A. program in International Affairs is designed to provide students with a broad understanding of the contemporary issues in international affairs while developing in-depth knowledge of at least one specialized area at either the global or regional level.

Continue reading “Fall 2020 App Tips: M.A. International Affairs”

#IncomingElliott: George Leaua

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George Vladimir Leaua is a first-year graduate student pursuing an M.A. in International Science and Technology Policy. George is a recent graduate of International Affairs at the Elliott School of International Affairs. As a Romanian international student, his main areas of focus during his undergraduate studies have been European and Eurasian international politics and security, political philosophy, and during his senior year space policy and astronomy. He volunteered for the Romanian Embassy in Washington DC and took on a position of advisor at the Permanent Mission of Romania to the United Nations, focusing on disarmament, security, global politics and space affairs. Currently, his research interests include the ethics of space exploration and space commerce, space law, and international cooperation between European states and the United States on new emerging technologies.

What made you interested in your undergrad field of study and how, if at all, did that contribute to your decision to go to grad school?

Growing up in Romania during its Nord-Atlantic and European integrations has made me interested in the field of international affairs. Furthermore, the concept of globalization was instrumental to my formative years. When developing an understanding of the world, I did not focus just on my neighborhood, city, or country, but rather sought to encompass other countries, with their own histories, languages, and politics into the equation. During my undergrad years, I understood that the field of international affairs is very broad, and I knew I should look for a niche on which to focus. After finishing most of my requirements, I took every space-oriented course offered by the university. Those classes (astronomy, space policy etc.) convinced me to focus my future studies on the international relations of outer space, a rapidly evolving environment as more and more countries pursue different developments in outer space.

What are you looking forward to about starting your MA program?

I am excited to be studying more thoroughly the space-related issues of today and the challenges of tomorrow. However, I am most looking forward to connecting with my fellow students, many of whom are already accomplished professionals working for important institutions and companies of the space industry. It is exciting to be part of a group of students interested in studying space, and who will most likely become future space leaders all around the world.

 Is there anything about moving to DC/starting grad school that you’re nervous about?

As a continuing student of GW, I am lucky to not have to experience a difficult transition into the environment of DC. When first moving here for college, I had a somewhat difficult time adapting to the local culture, especially the food. Now that I am starting graduate school, I am nervous but at the same time excited about the academic challenges, including more extensive and deeper research of highly complex topics (such as space economy and law), and the capstone program. However, I know from my undergraduate experience that my professors and peers will be of great help through these challenges I’m about to face.

The #InocmingElliott series highlights incoming Elliott School graduate students and seeks to answer common questions posed by prospective and current students. The views expressed by students profiled do not necessarily represent those of organizations they work for, are affiliated with, or the Elliott School of International Affairs. For more information or to submit questions, e-mail esiagrad@gwu.edu.

Application Tips: M.A. Global Communication

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The Master of Arts in Global Communication is offered jointly by GW’s Elliott School of International Affairs and Columbian College of Arts and Sciences’ School of Media and Public Affairs (SMPA). It combines the Elliott School’s globally recognized academic excellence in international affairs with SMPA’s strengths as a leading school of communication and journalism. This graduate program helps students understand the complex global information environment; its implications for governance, security, and business; and how to communicate effectively with global audiences.

M.A. Global Communication Curriculum

Students in this program will take a rigorous academic program that prepares them both intellectually and professionally for exciting careers in the public, private, and non-profit sectors. As a student in the Global Communication program, you will learn about the fascinating and rapidly evolving global information environment. As a future or advancing professionally in the field, you will learn how to work in this environment and communicate effectively with audiences worldwide.

Students who are enrolled in the Global Communications program can choose from one of the following specializations:

Communication and Information Technology in International Affairs
Conflict and Conflict Resolution
Global Gender Policy
International Development
International Economic Affairs
International Law and Organizations
Public Diplomacy
U.S. Foreign Policy
U.S. National Security Policy and Practice

Additionally, Global Communication students can elect to add a second regional specialization from one of the following:

Asian Studies
European and Eurasian Studies
Latin American and Hemispheric Studies
Middle East Studies

M.A. Global Communication Application: Fall 2019

The Masters in Global Communication program has two admission prerequisites: economics courses and foreign language proficiency.

Economics prerequisite:
Course background in economics (micro- and macroeconomics) is a prerequisite to help prepare students to complete the graduate-level economics course(s) required within the M.A. in International Affairs curriculum. Course(s) must be successfully completed through an accredited institution in:

  • Introductory Microeconomics and
  • Introductory Macroeconomics
    -OR-
  • Principles of Economics

An applicant may be admitted who has not fulfilled the economics requirement; in this case, the applicant will be required to take course(s) at an accredited college/university prior to enrollment at the Elliott School.

Foreign language prerequisite:
Academic coursework in a foreign language, which will prepare students to complete the program’s language requirement*, must be shown at the time of application. This can be demonstrated by:

  • Study that is equal to four semesters of university-level coursework or equivalent.
  • Completion of formal language training as part of employment (ex. Peace Corps, JET, etc.) .
  • Growing up in a household where the language is spoken.

Meeting the Language Requirement: In the case that you cannot show language proficiency via coursework, applicants may indicate native proficiency or by having a professor or tutor indicate in writing how many semesters of coursework your training is equivalent to. Alternately, you may also consider submitting a letter from your employer, providing information and confirming completion of formal language training programs that you’ve participated in. Please note that in some cases, admissions may require additional supporting documentation not listed above.

*Students need to have a strong foundation in a foreign language at the time of application and before enrolling, to be successful in completing the language requirement during the program.


Application Tips

Review all Application Requirements.  The more knowledge you have about the application process, the more successful you will be as an applicant. Click here to start your application!

1. Upload your documents in PDF format in the correct orientation. Please don’t upload sideways or upside down transcripts, be sure all pages appear upright after uploading to your application. Unofficial transcripts are accepted, but please do not upload certified, encrypted, or password-protected files or files in.png, .jpeg, or .html format.

2. Understand the requirements of the program in which you are interested in applying for. Save yourself from spending $80 on an application for a program you’re not eligible to apply to by looking for the “Prerequisites” section of each program page.

3. Make sure your transcripts have all the necessary info. We accept official and unofficial transcript uploads for the graduate application. All transcripts must include:

  • The name of the institution,
  • All coursework (name of courses),
  • Grades for each course,
  • Transcript legend/grading scale, and
  • Proof of earned degrees from each institution you’ve attended (Degree Conferral).

More info on transcript requirements, including requirements on transcripts from foreign institutions, can be found on our website under the “Transcripts” tab.

4. Submit your fee waiver request early. Fee waivers take 1-2 business days to be reviewed and can only be approved at the time of application. If an applicant submits an application and pays the fee, without selecting the fee waiver payment method, the fee cannot be refunded. Check our website for more info under the “Application/Fee” tab.

5. Read the emails our office sends you. Often there are follow up questions that are answered in the email or it may contain other important information relevant to your application.

6. Elliott is spelled with two L’s and two T’s!!!

7. All Elliott School graduate programs are test optional. This means that GRE scores are not required as part of the application to any of our graduate programs.

8. There are 2 deadlines for the fall 2019 application cycle: January 7th if you want to be considered for funding and February 1 to be considered for admission only. Applications submitted after January 7th are not eligible to be considered for funding!

Still have questions? Let us know!
The Office of Graduate Admissions
1957 E. St NW, Suite 301
Washington, D.C. 20052
202-994-7050
esiagrad@gwu.edu

Application Tips: M.A. European & Eurasian Studies

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The Master of Arts program in European and Eurasian Studies (EES) at the Elliott School of International Affairs provides an interdisciplinary approach to analyzing the functional principles that define Western, Central, and Eastern Europe in conjunction with Russia and Eurasia.

M.A. European and Eurasian Studies Curriculum

Our curriculum combines required and elective courses that allow students to pursue their professional and intellectual interests. In addition, the EES program helps students develop practical skills that are essential in the professional world of international affairs.

Students who are in this program choose one of the following professional specializations:

European and Eurasian Cultures
International Economics, Political Economy, Business
International Education
International Health Policy and Programs
International Organization, Diplomacy, and Globalization
International Security Policy
Science, Technology, and International Affairs

M.A. European and Eurasian Studies Application: Fall 2019

The Masters in European and Eurasian Studies has two admission prerequisites: economics courses and foreign language proficiency.

Economics prerequisite:
Course background in economics (micro- and macroeconomics) is a prerequisite to help prepare students to complete the graduate-level economics course(s) required within the M.A. in International Affairs curriculum. Course(s) must be successfully completed through an accredited institution in:

  • Introductory Microeconomics and
  • Introductory Macroeconomics
    -OR-
  • Principles of Economics

An applicant may be admitted who has not fulfilled the economics requirement; in this case, the applicant will be required to take course(s) at an accredited college/university prior to enrollment at the Elliott School.

Foreign language prerequisite:
Academic coursework in a major European language (including Russian), which will prepare students to complete the program’s language requirement*, must be shown at the time of application. This can be demonstrated by

  • Study that is equal to four semesters of university-level coursework or equivalent.
  • Completion of formal language training as part of employment (ex. Peace Corps, JET, etc.).
  • Growing up in a household where the language is spoken.

Meeting the Language Requirement: In the case that you cannot show language proficiency via coursework, applicants may indicate native proficiency or by having a professor or tutor indicate in writing how many semesters of coursework your training is equivalent to. Alternately, you may also consider submitting a letter from your employer, providing information and confirming completion of formal language training programs that you’ve participated in. Please note that in some cases, admissions may require additional supporting documentation not listed above.

*Students need to have a strong foundation in a foreign language at the time of application and before enrolling, to be successful in completing the language requirement during the program.


Application Tips

Review all Application Requirements.  The more knowledge you have about the application process, the more successful you will be as an applicant. Click here to start your application!

1. Upload your documents in PDF format in the correct orientation. Please don’t upload sideways or upside down transcripts, be sure all pages appear upright after uploading to your application. Unofficial transcripts are accepted, but please do not upload certified, encrypted, or password-protected files or files in.png, .jpeg, or .html format.

2. Understand the requirements of the program in which you are interested in applying for. Save yourself from spending $80 on an application for a program you’re not eligible to apply to by looking for the “Prerequisites” section of each program page.

3. Make sure your transcripts have all the necessary info. We accept official and unofficial transcript uploads for the graduate application. All transcripts must include:

  • The name of the institution,
  • All coursework (name of courses),
  • Grades for each course,
  • Transcript legend/grading scale, and
  • Proof of earned degrees from each institution you’ve attended (Degree Conferral).

More info on transcript requirements, including requirements on transcripts from foreign institutions, can be found on our website under the “Transcripts” tab.

4. Submit your fee waiver request early. Fee waivers take 1-2 business days to be reviewed and can only be approved at the time of application. If an applicant submits an application and pays the fee, without selecting the fee waiver payment method, the fee cannot be refunded. Check our website for more info under the “Application/Fee” tab.

5. Read the emails our office sends you. Often there are follow up questions that are answered in the email or it may contain other important information relevant to your application.

6. Elliott is spelled with two L’s and two T’s!!!

7. All Elliott School graduate programs are test optional. This means that GRE scores are not required as part of the application to any of our graduate programs.

8. There are 2 deadlines for the fall 2019 application cycle: January 7th if you want to be considered for funding and February 1 to be considered for admission only. Applications submitted after January 7th are not eligible to be considered for funding!

Still have questions? Let us know!
The Office of Graduate Admissions
1957 E. St NW, Suite 301
Washington, D.C. 20052
202-994-7050
esiagrad@gwu.edu